Park City Resort Reviews

Reviews for Park City

Read skier and snowboarder-submitted reviews on Park City that rank the ski resort and mountain town on a scale of one to five stars for attributes such as terrain, nightlife and family friendliness. See how Park City stacks up in the reviews, on and off the slopes, from skiing and family activities to the après scene. Read up on pros, cons and other comments in reviews left by fellow skiers and riders. Don't forget to submit your own Park City review! Scroll to the bottom of this page to let other travelers know about your skiing and resort experience.

Reviews for Park City

Total (3.6)
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159 Total Reviews:
5 Star Reviews (83)
4 Star Reviews (36)
3 Star Reviews (18)
2 Star Reviews (7)
1 Star Reviews (15)
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Most recent
jim goff
The Park City/Deer Valley ski area is the biggest lift-serviced area in North and South America including Whistler/Blackcomb, also typically with much better quality of snow than the West Coast. This skiiable terrain doesn't include the fact that they are more than doubling the size of Deer Valley next season with an additional 3700 acres. There really isn't an immediate convenient area that offers as much to do in Winter or all four Seasons in addition to downhill skiing. If you're looking for jamming as many options as possible into a destination resort then Park City is hands down your best bet. Activity-wise, trying to compare the Park City area with any number of popular ski resorts is like comparing a popular local amusement park with the entirety of Orlando. If that weren't enough the quality of the snow in Utah is usually far superior, especially these past two seasons. If you're going to be spending several days or a week or more in Park City, I strongly suggest you take advantage of the many nearby neighboring resorts that are not quite as busy on weekends, particularly those that are about an hour to the north. Adj. Deer Valley limits its skier numbers and is uber-posh but can be a bit expensive, (no more than lesser resorts in Colorado or California), but if you're on a budget plan ahead and you will beat the weekend crowds. There is a vast array of resorts along Utah's Wasatch Coast of Ski Mountains. Do your homework pre-trip and you won't be disappointed.... Full Review
The Park City ski area is huge...
The greater Wasatch Front Metr...
1 week ago
Anarcho Vol
The convenience factor here is high. It is such as easy drive from the SLC airport, but being so convenient to a major city obviously has its drawbacks. Not the place on holidays or weekends. I thought the Breck crowds were rough, but PC takes it to a new level. It’s amazing how much difference there is between weekends and midweek here, though. I would highly recommend focusing a trip to PC during weekdays, because weekends during peak season and good conditions get crowded to the point of insanity. Another nice feature of PC is the lower elevation relative to the big CO resorts. Everything in bounds is below 10,000 ft, so acclimation is much easier here than at Breck, Aspen, or Telluride. But just like the convenience factor, there is a downside to the lower elevation - snow retention. That said, it really just shortens PC’s season compared to the CO front range or Snowbird. Except in really good years, it really isn’t very good till the end of December, and season is done by 4/1. PC may not get the snow quality and totals they get just over the ridge line in the Cottonwoods, but it does have some very unique features. None of the resort is technically above tree line, but it does have some fantastic bowl areas (much like Vail in this regard). Because it’s not truly alpine, the bowls don’t suffer from wind exposure the same as alpine bowls in the CO front range. I do really love the variety of terrain here, and I recommend exploring both the PC and Canyons sides - although it’s best to concentrate on one or the other during a given day. For such a destination resort, the mountain village is a little lacking at PC both in terms of variety of lodging and restaurants, bars, etc. (I do highly recommend a shot and a shirt combo at the Pig Pen bar at the base on PCMR side). The Canyons side has more lodging but not really a true mountain village. Also, even though Park City has a fairly large downtown, it is becoming almost impossible to find a restaurant that allows walk-ins without reservations - it is quite frustrating. The average quality of service is also really quite disappointing compared to other destination resorts such as Jackson Hole, Telluride, Vail, or even Breck. ... Full Review
Convenient, Easy Access from A...
Crowded, Mountain Village is l...
1 year ago
Kevin Chan
I wish they would open up some night skiing. It looks like they had some lights available and they had night skiing back in the day, but now since it’s owned by Vail, no more night skiing is allowed :(... Full Review
Great Mountain Terrain, kind s...
Food is really expensive at th...
1 year ago
Daren Light
There is plenty terrain and many restaurants everywhere. Mountain staff can be found everywhere as well. There are helpful people willingnto help you in any situation. The only problem really is just to have more beginner terrain on the upper lifts. Maybe also to have another way to get from canyons to park city without using quicksilver. ... Full Review
Great long runs, fitted for al...
Not many cons, but for beginne...
1 year ago
Robert Carey
Been Park City in the canyons several times love the area great skiing great atmosphere and groomed mountains... Full Review
Lots of beautiful train for al...
A couple more inexpensive rest...
1 year ago
Ric Lowrey
Park City, a once iconic magical ski area is still suffering growing pains. Don't expect to walk up to the base area and find an accessible restroom or lift ticket booth. All your personal information is required of you and everyone in your group before receiving the privilege of purchasing their mega overpriced daily lift ticket. And that's all assuming you survive mege parking lots with no or very little sanitation sometimes located miles away from the base area. If you should you make it to the base area you are rewarded with a sea of people, all with full bladders searching for hidden rest rooms. In summary Park City is still an amazing place. But has lost respect for general public and their skiing and riding experience. If you are a rider who is bored to by endless groomers and tired of the corporate ski resort mentality there are still plenty of local ownes hills out their glad to sell you a day lift ticket and point you to the restroom. For me, a father, grandfather and lifetime skier (back to before freestyle skiing was even a thing) being relegated to a parking lot miles from the resort base, with zero facilities or even a basic sanitation, is not good enough. Best wishes and good luck.... Full Review
Good terain for beginner and i...
As usual with mega corporate o...
1 year ago
Lee
This resort has growing pains! Our family loved the varied terrain and the conditions were superb. We found the resort unprepared to handle the volume of skiers present. Be careful if you rent a condo or home near the resort We were two blocks away and there are limited shoveled sidewalks to access the main entrance of park city mountain. Skiers walking to the resort are walking on the same busy road as the buses and cars. Since the road can be icy, I saw a few skiers slip. There are icy sidewalks where shuttle buses and the town bus pickup. I did not feel safe accessing the resort or walking home. The time required to get to the terrain we wanted to ski took a lot more time than other resorts : there is a bottleneck at the two lifts that take skiers up the mountain, payday and crescent. Yesterday it took over 40 minutes to get on the first lift. In general it takes two lifts to really access the mountain if one is interested in more varied terrain. Trails are poorly signposted, so be sure to download a trail map. The access to Canyons is through the gondola, which shut down a number off times due to winds. When working, it is convenient. We enjoyed skiing the 9990 lift and cloud 9. Unfortunately, the resort is ill-equipped to handle higher volumes of skiers. We had an experience where a sleeping noise shut down one of the canyon lifts we were planning to use prior to returning to park city mountain. The only other lift had an hour wait in less than 10 degree weather (the only nearby dining facility tombstone is outdoor eating). The resort decided to shuttle skiers by vans to Park City Mountain. Over 200 people sttod in line for those vans. We decided to call Uber. After several Ubers cancelled, and finding out a van was blocking the access to our area, we were told to walk, which we did. Walking down the main icy road with ski boots and skis, next to trucks and cars felt unsafe again. Unlike other resorts that have walking trails, we. We’re dangerously close to cars. On our way down the mountain, we. Noted only 2 small shuttles for all those people. Surely the resort could have better planning for skiers who spend a king’s ransom for this experience? On mountain dining is limited, so be sure to bring snacks and sandwiches for the lifts. Even when we had reservations at the Mines dining facility, we stood in a line outside the facility for 20 minutes. There were limited staff all over the mountain. It was said this is because Vail resort pays their mountain staff lower wages than other resorts and has lost employees. It was a palpable difference relative to other resorts we have visited, and I think directly related to the number of skier collisions witnessed and unsafe slow zones (there are a number of areas on the mountain where more advanced terrain empties onto green terrain and needs better traffic directions!) The apres-ski is located in the town of Park City, about half a mile from the resort base. This is an adorable town that has a nice range of dining options and lovely boutiques. The cuisine at the places we dined was creative and memorable (Handle, Riverhorse, the Brick) check out the lobster bisque at Riverhorse and the bacon parsnips at Handle! Overall a fun family vacation hindered by Vail Resorts’ inadequate planning and concern for skier safety or convenience. I hope they have a development plan that gets accelerated!... Full Review
This is a big mountain. When ...
Disorganized, access is not sk...
2 years ago
Mike Latini
Disappointed. There is no ski out available on canyons side. Hour to get off mountain. Relieve the pressure. Open up Docs Run and Shortcut. Seems like the first thing you would do. Also, no lift operators due to pay. Only Vail resorts. Seems like a few bad bussiness decisions. ... Full Review
Great slopes and powder
2 years ago
Dexter Baker
I am extremely biased here, because Park City, the Canyons to be more specific, is where I learned how to downhill ski. I wanted to give this place a five, because in my heart it's a five, but from a logical standpoint, it's a four, maybe a four point five. (but half points aren't allowed, unfortunately.) Let me tell you about my experiences as a beginner skier, struggling to even put my skis on, an intermediate who could do the harder blues, and as not exactly an expert, but as a good skier who could consistently do the blacks, and some of the double blacks. My first day on skis, ever, was here. It was at High Meadow Park in the Canyons, looping the only green run on the Canyons side: Meadow Way (Now, technically Upper Mainline is also a green, but it's like twenty feet long, and connects into Meadow Way; it's less of a run and more of an access.). (now called Mellow Moose) Before I did that, I did the Magic Carpet hill, and after a few hours, I switched to Meadow May. Meadow May is a mediocre place to learn how to ski. The big issue with Meadow Way (and what I loved on days three and four about it) is that it is long, and has lots of runs, ranging from other greens to harder blacks popping out into it. It can be intimidating, to see a long slope, and with expert skiers rushing down the hills and coming from places obfuscated by trees and sometimes fully obscured by turns. On day one, I had a full-fledged mental breakdown. Day two was a little more solid, I got in the groove of Meadow Way, and began to get comfortable making turns. A beginner will quickly find Meadow Way to be tamed. By the end of day two, I could adequately snowplow to the point where Meadow Way was no longer a threat to me. On the aforementioned days three and four, I (as already hinted), started to enjoy the length of the run. Because of its long length, there's multiple side paths to explore. I believe that there are five main routes: Mainline - a blue which is a glorified green until the very, very end in which there is a short real blue section; a great run to transition from greens to blues, and the first blue I ever did. Alley Cat - an easier version of Mainline, it can be a little tricky for beginners to turn while going downhill in a more narrow environment, with more limited visibility, but it is a good first real run (also the first run I enjoyed on the mountain.). Hidden Bear - a winding, longer, semi-narrow tree run with some banks where you can practice skidding and keeping your skis parallel and even and some slightly sharp turns. Badger's Bypass - a less steep version of Mainline, accessible only through gaining enough speed at the very end of Hidden Bear; you technically only do the end of Badger's Bypass, as the first two thirds are accessible only through another lift. (Saddleback.) And Porcupine Plunge - an escape route from Mainline that's slightly less steep, veered towards people who panic when confronted with the final hill of mainline. In addition to these five runs are some interesting tree areas, jumps, and an actually challenging unnamed mogul run that's perfect if you want to do something a little harder while sticking with a beginner friend / family member. As a very, very beginner, the Canyons (can't speak to the Park City side), isn't the greatest, but Days Three and Four, when I exclusively looped High Meadow Lift were actually pretty fun, until it finally started to get boring around the afternoon of Day Four. My beginner experience at the Canyons was solid, and High Meadow certainly got me hooked. When I did Mainline and Alley Cat for the first time on Days Three and Four respectively, I saw the potential for fun that came with skiing for the first time. As a beginner, I'd say it was a solid experience overall. Not too bad, but a little more green content would be nice, because boy-oh-boy did I get bored. As an intermediate skier, Park City was wonderful. The bulk of the runs in Park City are blue, and I had fun meandering through the long runs such as Harmony, getting lost in the seemingly endless fields of blues, and gliding through the snow on a nice powder day. At one point, when I was skiing in the Canyons, through an area with houses and roads and bridges that you ski both under and over called the Colony, I had an out-of-Earth experience, where I truly felt like I had found inner serenity - with ski runs above , below, left, and right, and no summit or base or lifts in-sight; the Colony and the runs there felt like they would last forever, and Earth felt like a distant memory to me, too. There are some fun blue-level natural halfpipes that I had a great time on as an intermediate skier, and there was lots to explore. Being able to consistently do harder blues makes Park City a wonderful experience. There are also some pretty easy blacks, and on a powder day I highly recommend taking a stab at either The Drop (Steep, but short and free of moguls) or Pinball Alley (Not Steep, but narrow, mogul infested, and it's a natural halfpipe; I like natural halfpipes a lot so Pinball Alley was my run of choice for first black.). Finally, as a good skier, who can do blacks and easier double blacks, Park City is honestly pretty good. Jupiter Peak, 9,990, Super Condor / Murdock Peak, and other harder areas are pretty strong. There isn't a ton of double blacks, as they are mostly contained to the hard areas, and can feel quite same-y. For example, on the Super Condor lift (a lift on the Canyons side), there are like ten double blacks that all feel exactly the same to ski, and a lot of them are frequently closed due to conditions or lack of snow. I think Jupiter Peak, in the Park City side, does a better job with this, because the routes felt a little more different. 9,990, the really tough lift to the highest point of the Canyons, also does alright with this, but some of the runs meld together a little too much. There are also some really tough loose double blacks such as Abyss and Deschutes / Grande. Decent for experts, but having double blacks in a few more places would be preferable, but alas, how the mountain was formed is not up to Park City. As for the experience outside of skiing, it's pretty nice. Colony houses are idealistic, but kind of a pain because it makes the awesome restaurants such as the Farm at Canyons Village inaccessible for dinner. The hotels and rental homes in both villages (Park City Village and Canyons Village) are nice. Food is pretty good, and like I said before, the Farm at Canyons Village is a real high quality dining experience. (but it is pricey; good final day destination in my opinion.) The on-mountain restaurants are nice, and are certainly a good touch. One frustrating thing about learning to ski in Park City, was that most of the on-mountain restaurants required being able to ski blues. (I will say that this did lead to one of the nicest experience of my life as a whole, which was on my last day of my first week skiing at the Canyons, I finally explored the mountain, and I went from all the way from the peak furthest to the left in the Canyons to eat, all the way to the far right peak of the mountain; I did seventy two runs that day! Legendary experience, and something I wish I could relive. Nothing can overstate my satisfaction that I felt after reaching the restaurant, the restaurant in question - Cloud Dine - requires one to ski three blues to access, and I had dreamed all week of going, and I achieved my goal. Food there was good, too.) Prices are a little strenuous, but I personally think it's worth the cost as a "save-up-for-this-one" trip, because it has given me some wonderful memories. Also, crowds can be annoying, so get out there early!!! Not too bad once you're on the mountain, though. Also, the lifts usually start running around 8:30 AM (they're supposed to open at 9:00 AM), so you can usually get a pinch of extra skiing in if you're quick. TL;DR: Park City is a little crowded, and a little expensive, but is a wonderful resort, especially for higher level intermediate skiers. It's a decent place to learn, a great place to explore, and a wonderful pace to challenge yourself. Highly recommend. On a powder day... it is heavenly. ... Full Review
Lots to Explore, Hard to Get B...
Crowds on Park City side, lear...
3 years ago
Colton E
On a powder day it's so amazing and is has the softest snow I have ever skied on other than snowbird. When I was there we got 11" overnight and you can still find fresh tracks 1day after the storm.... Full Review
Terrain is intermediate with d...
In March the base area can get...
3 years ago
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