Legends of Vail: Portraits of the most influential people at Vail, from Pete Seibert to Lindsey Vonn.

14th December 2012 | Andy Bigford

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Pete Seibert, one of Vail's founders, is on the left. - ©Vail Resorts

Pete Seibert, one of Vail's founders, is on the left.
Copyright: Vail Resorts

Pete Seibert, one of Vail's founders, is on the left. - ©Vail Resorts
Finder, Founder / Earl Eaton, Pete Seibert: Their complimentary skills and styles formed the perfect partnership to launch Vail. The quiet, unassuming Eaton grew up in a homesteader’s cabin, learned to ski on pine boards fashioned by his father, and served as an army engineer in World War II. In 1957, while other 10th Mountain Division pioneers scoured the state for ski resort locations, Eaton struck gold, leading Seibert above Vail’s deceiving front face to its bountiful upper slopes—and then into the Back Bowls to seal the deal. He played a critical role in laying out the trails and lifts, though he would never see a big payday for his efforts and didn’t seem to mind. Seibert, a brash New Englander who dreamed of building the quintessential ski resort as a child, was a 10th Mountain vet who meticulously studied the resorts of the Alps. He had vision, passion and an uncanny ability to get things done—lining up investors, acquiring the ranch land at the base, and, after opening Vail in December 1962, directing its daily operations until the mid-1970s. In 2000, SKI Magazine, in its list of the most influential skiers in history, named Seibert No. 3.  Pete Seibert is on the left.

Finder, Founder / Earl Eaton, Pete Seibert: Their complimentary skills and styles formed the perfect partnership to launch Vail. The quiet, unassuming Eaton grew up in a homesteader’s cabin, learned to ski on pine boards fashioned by his father, and served as an army engineer in World War II. In 1957, while other 10th Mountain Division pioneers scoured the state for ski resort locations, Eaton struck gold, leading Seibert above Vail’s deceiving front face to its bountiful upper slopes—and then into the Back Bowls to seal the deal. He played a critical role in laying out the trails and lifts, though he would never see a big payday for his efforts and didn’t seem to mind. Seibert, a brash New Englander who dreamed of building the quintessential ski resort as a child, was a 10th Mountain vet who meticulously studied the resorts of the Alps. He had vision, passion and an uncanny ability to get things done—lining up investors, acquiring the ranch land at the base, and, after opening Vail in December 1962, directing its daily operations until the mid-1970s. In 2000, SKI Magazine, in its list of the most influential skiers in history, named Seibert No. 3. Pete Seibert is on the left.

Finder, Founder / Earl Eaton, Pete Seibert: Their complimentary skills and styles formed the perfect partnership to launch Vail. The quiet, unassuming Eaton grew up in a homesteader’s cabin, learned to ski on pine boards fashioned by his father, and served as an army engineer in World War II. In 1957, while other 10th Mountain Division pioneers scoured the state for ski resort locations, Eaton struck gold, leading Seibert above Vail’s deceiving front face to its bountiful upper slopes—and then into the Back Bowls to seal the deal. He played a critical role in laying out the trails and lifts, though he would never see a big payday for his efforts and didn’t seem to mind. Seibert, a brash New Englander who dreamed of building the quintessential ski resort as a child, was a 10th Mountain vet who meticulously studied the resorts of the Alps. He had vision, passion and an uncanny ability to get things done—lining up investors, acquiring the ranch land at the base, and, after opening Vail in December 1962, directing its daily operations until the mid-1970s. In 2000, SKI Magazine, in its list of the most influential skiers in history, named Seibert No. 3.  Pete Seibert is on the left.
Local Boy Makes Good / Chris Jarnot: Chris Jarnot thinks he might have the best job in the world, and he found it in the same valley where he grew up. As the COO of Vail Mountain, Jarnot now leads the resort he once explored as a kid, the place where he started his career as an intern in the marketing department, the mountain his own children now explore. His demeanor is calm and thoughtful, but there’s fire and passion lurking below, especially when he’s directing Vail’s mission to be the best it can be. His devotion led Vail, despite coming off one of its worst snow years ever, to install the state-of-the-art Gondola One in the Vail Village for this 50th anniversary season, paying homage to the original gondola on the same site. When Vail hosted a Pioneers Weekend this past fall, welcoming back the individuals who were involved in its formative years, even the usually stoic Jarnot was touched by the praise he heard from his predecessors for the mountain and the village. “The people who were here in the beginning are really, really proud of what Vail’s become,” he says. - ©Julia Vandenoever

Local Boy Makes Good / Chris Jarnot: Chris Jarnot thinks he might have the best job in the world, and he found it in the same valley where he grew up. As the COO of Vail Mountain, Jarnot now leads the resort he once explored as a kid, the place where he started his career as an intern in the marketing department, the mountain his own children now explore. His demeanor is calm and thoughtful, but there’s fire and passion lurking below, especially when he’s directing Vail’s mission to be the best it can be. His devotion led Vail, despite coming off one of its worst snow years ever, to install the state-of-the-art Gondola One in the Vail Village for this 50th anniversary season, paying homage to the original gondola on the same site. When Vail hosted a Pioneers Weekend this past fall, welcoming back the individuals who were involved in its formative years, even the usually stoic Jarnot was touched by the praise he heard from his predecessors for the mountain and the village. “The people who were here in the beginning are really, really proud of what Vail’s become,” he says.
Copyright: Julia Vandenoever

Local Boy Makes Good / Chris Jarnot: Chris Jarnot thinks he might have the best job in the world, and he found it in the same valley where he grew up. As the COO of Vail Mountain, Jarnot now leads the resort he once explored as a kid, the place where he started his career as an intern in the marketing department, the mountain his own children now explore. His demeanor is calm and thoughtful, but there’s fire and passion lurking below, especially when he’s directing Vail’s mission to be the best it can be. His devotion led Vail, despite coming off one of its worst snow years ever, to install the state-of-the-art Gondola One in the Vail Village for this 50th anniversary season, paying homage to the original gondola on the same site. When Vail hosted a Pioneers Weekend this past fall, welcoming back the individuals who were involved in its formative years, even the usually stoic Jarnot was touched by the praise he heard from his predecessors for the mountain and the village. “The people who were here in the beginning are really, really proud of what Vail’s become,” he says. - ©Julia Vandenoever
Pied Pipers / Pepi and Sheika Gramshammer: Pepi, a champion ski racer from Innsbruck, and Sheika, daughter of a renowned Austrian innkeeping family, made a wise investment and a lifelong commitment to Vail in 1964. They bought a half-acre of land on Bridge Street and, backed by an investment group that included Howard Head, opened Hotel-Gasthof Gramshammer, which would also include a restaurant, bar and ski shop. “It was the best move I ever made,” says Pepi, who along with Sheika entertained guests as if they were family, enthusiastically spread their love of the mountain lifestyle, and helped countless skiers improve through the all-inclusive Pepi’s Wedel Weeks program. In addition to philanthropic efforts that included organizing Vail’s Crystal Ski Ball since 1981 and supporting groups ranging from the Vail Valley Foundation to Ski and Snowboard Club Vail, Pepi was instrumental in bringing the World Alpine Championships to the Vail Valley.  - ©Julia Vandenoever

Pied Pipers / Pepi and Sheika Gramshammer: Pepi, a champion ski racer from Innsbruck, and Sheika, daughter of a renowned Austrian innkeeping family, made a wise investment and a lifelong commitment to Vail in 1964. They bought a half-acre of land on Bridge Street and, backed by an investment group that included Howard Head, opened Hotel-Gasthof Gramshammer, which would also include a restaurant, bar and ski shop. “It was the best move I ever made,” says Pepi, who along with Sheika entertained guests as if they were family, enthusiastically spread their love of the mountain lifestyle, and helped countless skiers improve through the all-inclusive Pepi’s Wedel Weeks program. In addition to philanthropic efforts that included organizing Vail’s Crystal Ski Ball since 1981 and supporting groups ranging from the Vail Valley Foundation to Ski and Snowboard Club Vail, Pepi was instrumental in bringing the World Alpine Championships to the Vail Valley.
Copyright: Julia Vandenoever

Pied Pipers / Pepi and Sheika Gramshammer: Pepi, a champion ski racer from Innsbruck, and Sheika, daughter of a renowned Austrian innkeeping family, made a wise investment and a lifelong commitment to Vail in 1964. They bought a half-acre of land on Bridge Street and, backed by an investment group that included Howard Head, opened Hotel-Gasthof Gramshammer, which would also include a restaurant, bar and ski shop. “It was the best move I ever made,” says Pepi, who along with Sheika entertained guests as if they were family, enthusiastically spread their love of the mountain lifestyle, and helped countless skiers improve through the all-inclusive Pepi’s Wedel Weeks program. In addition to philanthropic efforts that included organizing Vail’s Crystal Ski Ball since 1981 and supporting groups ranging from the Vail Valley Foundation to Ski and Snowboard Club Vail, Pepi was instrumental in bringing the World Alpine Championships to the Vail Valley.  - ©Julia Vandenoever
Skier- And Golfer-In-Chief / President Gerald R. Ford: Ford and his family fell hard for Vail on their first visit in 1968, and the then Michigan Congressman took out a second mortgage to buy a vacation condo at the Lodge at Vail. As fate would have it, the networks were queued up a half dozen years later covering President Ford’s visits to the “Western White House,” and beaming images of Vail around the world. The Vail Valley would eventually become The First Couple’s home for half of the year and a focal point for many of their post-White House endeavors, including the World Forum. The Jerry Ford Golf Invitational brought invaluable attention to Vail’s summer season, and Ford’s longtime role with the Vail Valley Foundation helped bring the World Alpine Championships to the valley. The First Couple gambled in 1982 on a new resort rising out of a lettuce field west of Vail, and their home ownership at Beaver Creek boosted the resort’s ascent. Their contributions helped build the Ford Amphitheatre, the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens, the Vilar Performing Arts Center, the Beaver Creek Chapel and the Vail Public Library.

Skier- And Golfer-In-Chief / President Gerald R. Ford: Ford and his family fell hard for Vail on their first visit in 1968, and the then Michigan Congressman took out a second mortgage to buy a vacation condo at the Lodge at Vail. As fate would have it, the networks were queued up a half dozen years later covering President Ford’s visits to the “Western White House,” and beaming images of Vail around the world. The Vail Valley would eventually become The First Couple’s home for half of the year and a focal point for many of their post-White House endeavors, including the World Forum. The Jerry Ford Golf Invitational brought invaluable attention to Vail’s summer season, and Ford’s longtime role with the Vail Valley Foundation helped bring the World Alpine Championships to the valley. The First Couple gambled in 1982 on a new resort rising out of a lettuce field west of Vail, and their home ownership at Beaver Creek boosted the resort’s ascent. Their contributions helped build the Ford Amphitheatre, the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens, the Vilar Performing Arts Center, the Beaver Creek Chapel and the Vail Public Library.

Skier- And Golfer-In-Chief / President Gerald R. Ford: Ford and his family fell hard for Vail on their first visit in 1968, and the then Michigan Congressman took out a second mortgage to buy a vacation condo at the Lodge at Vail. As fate would have it, the networks were queued up a half dozen years later covering President Ford’s visits to the “Western White House,” and beaming images of Vail around the world. The Vail Valley would eventually become The First Couple’s home for half of the year and a focal point for many of their post-White House endeavors, including the World Forum. The Jerry Ford Golf Invitational brought invaluable attention to Vail’s summer season, and Ford’s longtime role with the Vail Valley Foundation helped bring the World Alpine Championships to the valley. The First Couple gambled in 1982 on a new resort rising out of a lettuce field west of Vail, and their home ownership at Beaver Creek boosted the resort’s ascent. Their contributions helped build the Ford Amphitheatre, the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens, the Vilar Performing Arts Center, the Beaver Creek Chapel and the Vail Public Library.
Vail Envoy / Chris Anthony: World-traveler Chris Anthony is a distinguished veteran of 23 Warren Miller films (his segment this season honors the 10th Mountain Division Ski Troops) and runs his own ski adventure travel company. Even when jetting off to locations both traditional (the Dolomites, Norway, Alaska, Portillo) and unusual (Iran, Ecuador, China), he finds it difficult to leave his hometown of Vail. “It’s the most consistent mountain I’ve ever skied,” he says. “Even last season, during the worst snow year ever, there was still great skiing on the groomers.” Critics dismiss Vail’s slopes as docile, but Anthony finds plenty of places to test himself both inbounds (Frontside Chutes, North and South Rim runs, Prima Cornice, Highline) and out (East Vail Chutes). Following a legacy of Vail philanthropy, Anthony has raised more than $1 million for non-profits through his Youth Initiative Project, designed to help kids set goals and reach their dreams. While meeting people of all ages during his far-flung travels, Anthony’s hometown is a reliable conversation starter. “It’s good name-dropping,” he says. - ©Julia Vandenoever

Vail Envoy / Chris Anthony: World-traveler Chris Anthony is a distinguished veteran of 23 Warren Miller films (his segment this season honors the 10th Mountain Division Ski Troops) and runs his own ski adventure travel company. Even when jetting off to locations both traditional (the Dolomites, Norway, Alaska, Portillo) and unusual (Iran, Ecuador, China), he finds it difficult to leave his hometown of Vail. “It’s the most consistent mountain I’ve ever skied,” he says. “Even last season, during the worst snow year ever, there was still great skiing on the groomers.” Critics dismiss Vail’s slopes as docile, but Anthony finds plenty of places to test himself both inbounds (Frontside Chutes, North and South Rim runs, Prima Cornice, Highline) and out (East Vail Chutes). Following a legacy of Vail philanthropy, Anthony has raised more than $1 million for non-profits through his Youth Initiative Project, designed to help kids set goals and reach their dreams. While meeting people of all ages during his far-flung travels, Anthony’s hometown is a reliable conversation starter. “It’s good name-dropping,” he says.
Copyright: Julia Vandenoever

Vail Envoy / Chris Anthony: World-traveler Chris Anthony is a distinguished veteran of 23 Warren Miller films (his segment this season honors the 10th Mountain Division Ski Troops) and runs his own ski adventure travel company. Even when jetting off to locations both traditional (the Dolomites, Norway, Alaska, Portillo) and unusual (Iran, Ecuador, China), he finds it difficult to leave his hometown of Vail. “It’s the most consistent mountain I’ve ever skied,” he says. “Even last season, during the worst snow year ever, there was still great skiing on the groomers.” Critics dismiss Vail’s slopes as docile, but Anthony finds plenty of places to test himself both inbounds (Frontside Chutes, North and South Rim runs, Prima Cornice, Highline) and out (East Vail Chutes). Following a legacy of Vail philanthropy, Anthony has raised more than $1 million for non-profits through his Youth Initiative Project, designed to help kids set goals and reach their dreams. While meeting people of all ages during his far-flung travels, Anthony’s hometown is a reliable conversation starter. “It’s good name-dropping,” he says. - ©Julia Vandenoever
Hometown Hero / Lindsey Vonn: Lindsey Vonn has done more for U.S. ski racing than anyone. It’s not just the results, which are the best ever for a U.S. Ski Team member, but her dedication to being a role model. Vonn approaches her endeavors with class and commitment, including a year-round fitness and training regimen that has no equal. She’s come full circle with Vail during her career, moving from Minnesota to the valley as a teen to train with Ski and Snowboard Club Vail, then returning after a hiatus to become a part-time resident and ambassador for Vail Resorts. She’s mobbed by thousands of kids and fans when making public appearances in Vail, and she believes that setting a good example is her most important responsibility. She stared down immense pressure to win gold in Vancouver, rebounded from a broken marriage to set World Cup records last season, and also found time to launch a Vail instruction program (Ski Girls Rock) designed to give the next generation the opportunity to break her records.

Hometown Hero / Lindsey Vonn: Lindsey Vonn has done more for U.S. ski racing than anyone. It’s not just the results, which are the best ever for a U.S. Ski Team member, but her dedication to being a role model. Vonn approaches her endeavors with class and commitment, including a year-round fitness and training regimen that has no equal. She’s come full circle with Vail during her career, moving from Minnesota to the valley as a teen to train with Ski and Snowboard Club Vail, then returning after a hiatus to become a part-time resident and ambassador for Vail Resorts. She’s mobbed by thousands of kids and fans when making public appearances in Vail, and she believes that setting a good example is her most important responsibility. She stared down immense pressure to win gold in Vancouver, rebounded from a broken marriage to set World Cup records last season, and also found time to launch a Vail instruction program (Ski Girls Rock) designed to give the next generation the opportunity to break her records.

Hometown Hero / Lindsey Vonn: Lindsey Vonn has done more for U.S. ski racing than anyone. It’s not just the results, which are the best ever for a U.S. Ski Team member, but her dedication to being a role model. Vonn approaches her endeavors with class and commitment, including a year-round fitness and training regimen that has no equal. She’s come full circle with Vail during her career, moving from Minnesota to the valley as a teen to train with Ski and Snowboard Club Vail, then returning after a hiatus to become a part-time resident and ambassador for Vail Resorts. She’s mobbed by thousands of kids and fans when making public appearances in Vail, and she believes that setting a good example is her most important responsibility. She stared down immense pressure to win gold in Vancouver, rebounded from a broken marriage to set World Cup records last season, and also found time to launch a Vail instruction program (Ski Girls Rock) designed to give the next generation the opportunity to break her records.
Teaching Life Lessons / Aldo Radamus: Today’s kids (and their parents) have never faced more challenges in their quest to compete on the slopes. Yet as the Vail Ski and Snowboard Club celebrates its 50th season, it counts more than 500 athletes in the program, the most ever. The turning point came a decade ago, when Executive Director Aldo Radamus led an effort to push beyond traditional alpine racing and strengthen programs and participation in snowboarding, freeskiing and Nordic, disciplines which now comprise half the club’s roster. VSSC also launched an academy in conjunction with the local school system that allows 166 of those athletes to train and compete full-time at about half the cost of similar programs. The club can point to 60-plus alums, led by Lindsey Vonn, who’ve made various U.S. Ski Teams, and hundreds who’ve earned college scholarships. But Radamus says the ultimate goal is to “give young people the opportunity to compete, and to learn about life through competition.”  - ©Julia Vandenoever

Teaching Life Lessons / Aldo Radamus: Today’s kids (and their parents) have never faced more challenges in their quest to compete on the slopes. Yet as the Vail Ski and Snowboard Club celebrates its 50th season, it counts more than 500 athletes in the program, the most ever. The turning point came a decade ago, when Executive Director Aldo Radamus led an effort to push beyond traditional alpine racing and strengthen programs and participation in snowboarding, freeskiing and Nordic, disciplines which now comprise half the club’s roster. VSSC also launched an academy in conjunction with the local school system that allows 166 of those athletes to train and compete full-time at about half the cost of similar programs. The club can point to 60-plus alums, led by Lindsey Vonn, who’ve made various U.S. Ski Teams, and hundreds who’ve earned college scholarships. But Radamus says the ultimate goal is to “give young people the opportunity to compete, and to learn about life through competition.”
Copyright: Julia Vandenoever

Teaching Life Lessons / Aldo Radamus: Today’s kids (and their parents) have never faced more challenges in their quest to compete on the slopes. Yet as the Vail Ski and Snowboard Club celebrates its 50th season, it counts more than 500 athletes in the program, the most ever. The turning point came a decade ago, when Executive Director Aldo Radamus led an effort to push beyond traditional alpine racing and strengthen programs and participation in snowboarding, freeskiing and Nordic, disciplines which now comprise half the club’s roster. VSSC also launched an academy in conjunction with the local school system that allows 166 of those athletes to train and compete full-time at about half the cost of similar programs. The club can point to 60-plus alums, led by Lindsey Vonn, who’ve made various U.S. Ski Teams, and hundreds who’ve earned college scholarships. But Radamus says the ultimate goal is to “give young people the opportunity to compete, and to learn about life through competition.”  - ©Julia Vandenoever
Big Picture Vision / Andy Daly: It seems fitting that the mayor of Vail was also the president of Vail Resorts, is the recipient of the National Ski Areas Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award, and oversees his own ski area in his spare time. Daly began his career as a patroller in 1970 and went on to hold top management positions at Copper Mountain, Beaver Creek, Eldora, Vail Mountain and Vail Resorts. After his tenure as president of Vail Resorts in 2002, Daly never imagined he’d enter politics, but a few years later he successfully ran for the Vail council and was selected by his peers a year ago to wield the gavel. “It’s a wonderful opportunity,” says Daly. “I came in with a comprehensive background, and I understand how important it is for everyone to work together.” Daly also became a part-owner of Powderhorn Ski Area, near Grand Junction, in the fall of 2011, and immediately announced plans to invest in and revitalize the community resort. - ©Julia Vandenoever

Big Picture Vision / Andy Daly: It seems fitting that the mayor of Vail was also the president of Vail Resorts, is the recipient of the National Ski Areas Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award, and oversees his own ski area in his spare time. Daly began his career as a patroller in 1970 and went on to hold top management positions at Copper Mountain, Beaver Creek, Eldora, Vail Mountain and Vail Resorts. After his tenure as president of Vail Resorts in 2002, Daly never imagined he’d enter politics, but a few years later he successfully ran for the Vail council and was selected by his peers a year ago to wield the gavel. “It’s a wonderful opportunity,” says Daly. “I came in with a comprehensive background, and I understand how important it is for everyone to work together.” Daly also became a part-owner of Powderhorn Ski Area, near Grand Junction, in the fall of 2011, and immediately announced plans to invest in and revitalize the community resort.
Copyright: Julia Vandenoever

Big Picture Vision / Andy Daly: It seems fitting that the mayor of Vail was also the president of Vail Resorts, is the recipient of the National Ski Areas Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award, and oversees his own ski area in his spare time. Daly began his career as a patroller in 1970 and went on to hold top management positions at Copper Mountain, Beaver Creek, Eldora, Vail Mountain and Vail Resorts. After his tenure as president of Vail Resorts in 2002, Daly never imagined he’d enter politics, but a few years later he successfully ran for the Vail council and was selected by his peers a year ago to wield the gavel. “It’s a wonderful opportunity,” says Daly. “I came in with a comprehensive background, and I understand how important it is for everyone to work together.” Daly also became a part-owner of Powderhorn Ski Area, near Grand Junction, in the fall of 2011, and immediately announced plans to invest in and revitalize the community resort. - ©Julia Vandenoever
Style Icons / Dave and Renie Gorsuch: Falling in love as members of the 1960 U.S. Olympic Ski Team, Dave and Renie brought mountain style and elegance to Vail when they opened Gorsuch Ltd. under the Clock Tower on Bridge Street in 1966. The Gorsuches set the standard for the top end, nurturing a sophisticated fashion sense blending the best of the Alps and the Rockies, matching Vail’s greater mission and identity. “I married a girl with very good taste,” Dave says. The family business (now including their three sons and six grandchildren) has grown to include eight locations and resonates worldwide through an eponymous catalogue with 3.5 million copies mailed annually. Through the years, the Gorsuches supported numerous Vail causes, including the hospital, Vail Mountain School and Ski and Snowboard Club Vail. With roots going back to 1962, when Dave and Renie opened their first store in a vacant gas station in Gunnison, Colo., Gorsuch, Ltd. also celebrates its 50th anniversary this season. “We never planned an empire,” says Dave, “we just went day-to-day.” - ©Courtesy of Dave and Renie Gorsuch

Style Icons / Dave and Renie Gorsuch: Falling in love as members of the 1960 U.S. Olympic Ski Team, Dave and Renie brought mountain style and elegance to Vail when they opened Gorsuch Ltd. under the Clock Tower on Bridge Street in 1966. The Gorsuches set the standard for the top end, nurturing a sophisticated fashion sense blending the best of the Alps and the Rockies, matching Vail’s greater mission and identity. “I married a girl with very good taste,” Dave says. The family business (now including their three sons and six grandchildren) has grown to include eight locations and resonates worldwide through an eponymous catalogue with 3.5 million copies mailed annually. Through the years, the Gorsuches supported numerous Vail causes, including the hospital, Vail Mountain School and Ski and Snowboard Club Vail. With roots going back to 1962, when Dave and Renie opened their first store in a vacant gas station in Gunnison, Colo., Gorsuch, Ltd. also celebrates its 50th anniversary this season. “We never planned an empire,” says Dave, “we just went day-to-day.”
Copyright: Courtesy of Dave and Renie Gorsuch

Style Icons / Dave and Renie Gorsuch: Falling in love as members of the 1960 U.S. Olympic Ski Team, Dave and Renie brought mountain style and elegance to Vail when they opened Gorsuch Ltd. under the Clock Tower on Bridge Street in 1966. The Gorsuches set the standard for the top end, nurturing a sophisticated fashion sense blending the best of the Alps and the Rockies, matching Vail’s greater mission and identity. “I married a girl with very good taste,” Dave says. The family business (now including their three sons and six grandchildren) has grown to include eight locations and resonates worldwide through an eponymous catalogue with 3.5 million copies mailed annually. Through the years, the Gorsuches supported numerous Vail causes, including the hospital, Vail Mountain School and Ski and Snowboard Club Vail. With roots going back to 1962, when Dave and Renie opened their first store in a vacant gas station in Gunnison, Colo., Gorsuch, Ltd. also celebrates its 50th anniversary this season. “We never planned an empire,” says Dave, “we just went day-to-day.” - ©Courtesy of Dave and Renie Gorsuch

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