5 Reasons Spring Skiing is Best for Beginners

16th March 2017 | Shaun Moughan, Big Bear Mountain Resorts

News Regions: California

Resorts in this article: Bear Mountain, Mammoth Mountain Ski Area, Snow Summit

Warmer temps for spring skiing - ©Big Bear Mountain Resort

With warmer temps come happier extremities, and that’s no small thing, especially for the kiddos.

Copyright: Big Bear Mountain Resort

For skiers and riders, the winter of 2016/17 will go down as one of the best ever. Resorts across the west are re-writing their snowfall record books as storm after storm has delivered the goods. 

As cathartic as these insane snowfall totals have been, to one group of skiers and snowboarders, it hasn’t been quite so enjoyable. For beginners, powder days can be a mixed blessing. Sliding around on snow is difficult enough; add in the variables created by 2 feet of fresh snow, and well, it can get a bit tricky. 

But spring is here, and with it comes the perfect opportunity for beginners, especially kids, to get out on the slopes. Why? Allow us to elaborate...

1. No Cold Fingers & Toes

Whoever invented toe warmers deserves a Nobel prize, but even those small pouches of life-giving goodness have their limits. In the beginning, it’s all about having fun, and it’s hard to have fun if you can’t feel your fingers or toes. With warmer temps come happier extremities, and that’s no small thing, especially for the kiddos.

2. Fewer Lift Lines, More Groomer (& Tan) Lines

No one’s ever learned how to ski standing in a line. Getting multiple reps in succession is the best way to progress. In the middle of winter, when lift lines are at their longest, it can be hard to get into a flow. Fewer crowds also just means fewer hassles. Learning to ski can be daunting enough without navigating lines to get lift tickets, rent gear, etc.

Spring skiing means fewer lift and more groomer (and tan) lines. - ©Big Bear Mountain Resort

Spring skiing means fewer lift and more groomer (and tan) lines.

Copyright: Big Bear Mountain Resort

3. Discounts

You’ll find deals on everything from tickets and lodging to rentals and lessons in the spring, when reduced demand typically equates to reduced rates. And in some cases, it’s even free. Many mountains offer those who purchase a new season pass for the following winter the ability to use it right away. With some ski resorts like Mammoth staying open into the late spring and summer (July 4th, in their case), that equates to as much as three free months of skiing and riding when you commit to purchasing a pass for next winter. You can also find some good deals on gear this time of year, as retailers slash prices on remaining inventory.

Good deals on gear is just another perk of spring skiing. - ©Big Bear Mountain Resort

Good deals on gear is just another perk of spring skiing.

Copyright: Big Bear Mountain Resort

4. The vibe is different

You may have heard the saying that there’s “no friends on a powder day.” We think whoever coined that phrase needs new friends, but regardless, the opposite is true in the spring. An experience that can feel intimidating in the winter—lift lines packed full of powder hounds frothing at the mouth to get their fix—is much more approachable in the springtime. As the temps climb, it’s all about having fun, being outside in the sunshine with friends and enjoying the last couple months of the season. For new skiers and snowboarders, that translates to a much more enjoyable learning experience. It’s easy to remind yourself that this is supposed to be fun and not to take it too seriously when everyone else is doing the same.

Spring is more laid back on the slopes, which translates to a much more enjoyable learning experience. - ©Big Bear Mountain Resort

Spring is more laid back on the slopes, which translates to a much more enjoyable learning experience.

Copyright: Big Bear Mountain Resort

5. The snow is softer

The painful truth is that in the beginning, new skiers and snowboarders are going to fall. It’s not a bad thing. It’s the only way to improve, but it also may mean a few bumps and bruises along the way. In the springtime, the snow tends to soften up a bit, reducing the size of those bumps and bruises, even if slightly. When it comes to one’s tailbone, “slightly” isn't trivial.  

In the springtime, the snow tends to soften up a bit, reducing the size of those learning bumps and bruises, even if slightly. - ©Big Bear Mountain Resort

In the springtime, the snow tends to soften up a bit, reducing the size of those learning bumps and bruises, even if slightly.

Copyright: Big Bear Mountain Resort

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