Ski flicks rely on adrenaline: big descents, big air and big risk. But the usual components take a twist in Teton Gravity Research's new fall film—One For The Road—that launches its tour this week in Jackson, Wyo.

On the day the company sent the film to be made into DVDs, we caught up with TGR's Supervising Producer Greg Epstein to find out what audiences can expect from One For The Road. The movie aims to deliver adrenaline by the boatload, complete with high risk drops, carnage and more.

What makes One For The Road different from previous TGR movies is a storyline about being on the road to ski.

"This year we tried to keep a little bit of a story arc in the film," Epstein said. "Just a couple of stories with small subplots, nothing overwhelming."

That task of including a storyline, however, proved to be one of the most difficult jobs in putting the film together.

"The story is about people traveling and living on the road for the year with the positives and negatives of that," Epstein said. "We stopped and shot action, since that's what ski movies are about, but we had to pay a lot more attention to getting different bits of content and shoot additional scenes to make the movie work."

waterfall_by_Mark_Fisher

Nick Martini and Rory Bushfield next to Dettifoss Falls in Iceland while filming TGR's "One For The Road." Photo by Mark Fisher Photography.

Filming the road trips began in November 2010 and ended in July 2011. One For The Road balances its road trip story theme with action shots set on slopes in Japan, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, France, Utah, British Columbia, Alaska, Wyoming, and California. Squaw Valley" target="_blank">Squaw Valley USA and TGR's hometown Jackson Hole">Jackson Hole Mountain Resort are featured, too.

The action goes big in One For The Road to amp up the visual adrenaline, a goal that TGR has aimed for in their previous movies. "TGR as a whole has been on the cutting edge of making action films like this," Epstein tells us. "We know what sets the bar and what doesn't."

Knowing where that bar is means that some footage may not make the cut. Epstein compares shooting last winter for five weeks in Alaska with TGR's trip to Japan.

"In Alaska, the first two weeks were terrible, but the last two-and-a-half weeks were unbelievable. We got some of the best Alaska footage we've ever shot," Epstein said. "Japan was a different story. The weather didn't pan out as well, and a whole segment of the trip is not even in the movie. We won't compromise the film just because we spent the money to go."

For fans of ski carnage, one spectacular crash did make the cut. Last April while filming in Alaska, Ian McIntosh broke his femur during a heli-ski session with Daron Rhalves and Sage Cattabriga-Alosa. The film includes footage of McIntosh's ragdoll tumble down an icy ridge spine.

One For The Road premieres September 17 at Walk Festival Hall in Teton Village in Jackson Hole, Wyo. Shows start at 5:30 and 8 p.m. Proceeds from the Jackson Hole show benefit the Avalanche Forecast Support Organization and the Jackson Hole Ski Club Freeride Program. Tickets, which cost $12 or $14, can be purchased online.

The movie continues on its fall tour throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe. The full tour schedule is available online.

Check out the movie trailer for One For The Road.