Related Regions: British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, Ski Canada, North America

Whistler/Blackcomb Resort Photos

Whistler/Blackcomb Photos

Browse through our collection of photography from Whistler/Blackcomb to get acquainted with it before your ski trip or to relive great memories on the slopes at Whistler/Blackcomb.
Bluebird day!

Bluebird day!

Bluebird day!
Powder every were, what a day what a place

Powder every were, what a day what a place

Powder every were, what a day what a place
Fresh tracks was great today!

Fresh tracks was great today!

Fresh tracks was great today!
snowing all morming. grrat powder up in harmony bowl. best skiing do far this week

snowing all morming. grrat powder up in harmony bowl. best skiing do far this week

snowing all morming. grrat powder up in harmony bowl. best skiing do far this week
waited for the peak to open on Thursday,  it was unbelievable.  Knee deep powder on the front, knee deep pow on Peak to Creak. no lines, sunny breaks, best day i've had this season. awesome on harmony, garbanzo, pretty awesome everywhere...

waited for the peak to open on Thursday, it was unbelievable. Knee deep powder on the front, knee deep pow on Peak to Creak. no lines, sunny breaks, best day i've had this season. awesome on harmony, garbanzo, pretty awesome everywhere...

waited for the peak to open on Thursday,  it was unbelievable.  Knee deep powder on the front, knee deep pow on Peak to Creak. no lines, sunny breaks, best day i've had this season. awesome on harmony, garbanzo, pretty awesome everywhere...
Went on Sunday, the lineups were CRAZY waited for an hour just to get up to Blackcomb. Whistler had NO runs open because the snow (Avalanche check)

Went on Sunday, the lineups were CRAZY waited for an hour just to get up to Blackcomb. Whistler had NO runs open because the snow (Avalanche check)

Went on Sunday, the lineups were CRAZY waited for an hour just to get up to Blackcomb. Whistler had NO runs open because the snow (Avalanche check)
Lots of peeps but still some fresh on the sides and bowls if you hike

Lots of peeps but still some fresh on the sides and bowls if you hike

Lots of peeps but still some fresh on the sides and bowls if you hike
Pow pow and more pow.  Got stuck in 3 feet of pow and it kept coming down on Tuesday.   Upper mountain was closed. There will be pow on the top today.  Epic day Tuesday.  Thank you snow gods.

Pow pow and more pow. Got stuck in 3 feet of pow and it kept coming down on Tuesday. Upper mountain was closed. There will be pow on the top today. Epic day Tuesday. Thank you snow gods.

Pow pow and more pow.  Got stuck in 3 feet of pow and it kept coming down on Tuesday.   Upper mountain was closed. There will be pow on the top today.  Epic day Tuesday.  Thank you snow gods.
Epic day. Snowed all day.  Found myself knee deep in powder by the end of the day.

Epic day. Snowed all day. Found myself knee deep in powder by the end of the day.

Epic day. Snowed all day.  Found myself knee deep in powder by the end of the day.
Best whistler has been this season. Line ups were big, supposedly 23000 people! But it didn't feel like that up there. Well worth a visit, no wait! Avoid at all costs :)

Best whistler has been this season. Line ups were big, supposedly 23000 people! But it didn't feel like that up there. Well worth a visit, no wait! Avoid at all costs :)

Best whistler has been this season. Line ups were big, supposedly 23000 people! But it didn't feel like that up there. Well worth a visit, no wait! Avoid at all costs :)
53cm in 48hrs. Awesome conditions. First Lineups at the base were 35 mins long this morning, but once up 10-15. Picked a great week. Supposed to snow all til Sat. Wow

53cm in 48hrs. Awesome conditions. First Lineups at the base were 35 mins long this morning, but once up 10-15. Picked a great week. Supposed to snow all til Sat. Wow

53cm in 48hrs. Awesome conditions. First Lineups at the base were 35 mins long this morning, but once up 10-15. Picked a great week. Supposed to snow all til Sat. Wow
great powder day, not too cold, had a fantastic time. however visibility deteriorates during the late afternoon.

great powder day, not too cold, had a fantastic time. however visibility deteriorates during the late afternoon.

great powder day, not too cold, had a fantastic time. however visibility deteriorates during the late afternoon.
unreal powder day

unreal powder day

unreal powder day
Don't bother today

Don't bother today

Don't bother today
Good day to start, became a bit icy by noon. Heavy snow started in the afternoon and accumulated about 3cm by 4pm all the way to the bottom! Tomorrow is going to be amazing day for powder. It was pounding HARD and expected to produce more snow through tomorrow.

Good day to start, became a bit icy by noon. Heavy snow started in the afternoon and accumulated about 3cm by 4pm all the way to the bottom! Tomorrow is going to be amazing day for powder. It was pounding HARD and expected to produce more snow through tomorrow.

Good day to start, became a bit icy by noon. Heavy snow started in the afternoon and accumulated about 3cm by 4pm all the way to the bottom! Tomorrow is going to be amazing day for powder. It was pounding HARD and expected to produce more snow through tomorrow.
Amazing day up here!

Amazing day up here!

Amazing day up here!
awesome snow... been here since Tuesday. fresh snow every night. great visibility and conditions!

awesome snow... been here since Tuesday. fresh snow every night. great visibility and conditions!

awesome snow... been here since Tuesday. fresh snow every night. great visibility and conditions!
It just keeps on snowing . 7cm over night at least another 8-10cm since this report . ❤️ Happy Days

It just keeps on snowing . 7cm over night at least another 8-10cm since this report . ❤️ Happy Days

It just keeps on snowing . 7cm over night at least another 8-10cm since this report . ❤️ Happy Days
First day here & 14

First day here & 14"! LOTS of powder! Great runs but at top of one ski lift very windy, blustery and poor visibility. Not too packed-didnt have to wait too long in ski ticket line or ski lift lines. Overall great day!!

First day here & 14
Sunday's views

Sunday's views

Sunday's views
The north side of both mountains are good runs. The south sides are icy and dangerous. It is still a large amount of terrain with good hard pack skiing and the most beautifull mountain views I've ever seen

The north side of both mountains are good runs. The south sides are icy and dangerous. It is still a large amount of terrain with good hard pack skiing and the most beautifull mountain views I've ever seen

The north side of both mountains are good runs. The south sides are icy and dangerous. It is still a large amount of terrain with good hard pack skiing and the most beautifull mountain views I've ever seen
Super cold...have to pick around both mtns for semi soft snow.  Only groomers
 with it..

Super cold...have to pick around both mtns for semi soft snow. Only groomers with it..

Super cold...have to pick around both mtns for semi soft snow.  Only groomers
 with it..
Went up Sunday the 26th. Blackcomb was amazing mid mountain jersey cream chair. So warm. Main runs groomed has decent snow for no new snow. I can understand people's high standards for full price. Have a beer and chill out. Ridge runner was the best run. Enjoy people!!!!

Went up Sunday the 26th. Blackcomb was amazing mid mountain jersey cream chair. So warm. Main runs groomed has decent snow for no new snow. I can understand people's high standards for full price. Have a beer and chill out. Ridge runner was the best run. Enjoy people!!!!

Went up Sunday the 26th. Blackcomb was amazing mid mountain jersey cream chair. So warm. Main runs groomed has decent snow for no new snow. I can understand people's high standards for full price. Have a beer and chill out. Ridge runner was the best run. Enjoy people!!!!
Ice skating at Whistler! Pray for snow

Ice skating at Whistler! Pray for snow

Ice skating at Whistler! Pray for snow
fast runs. little to no glaze ice. avoid black diamonds runs - are hard and mogely.

fast runs. little to no glaze ice. avoid black diamonds runs - are hard and mogely.

fast runs. little to no glaze ice. avoid black diamonds runs - are hard and mogely.
Dave Murray lower is an ice rink. so sketchy..

Dave Murray lower is an ice rink. so sketchy..

Dave Murray lower is an ice rink. so sketchy..
7th heaven was great in the afternoon! Almost no people, lots of snow and glorious sunshine!

7th heaven was great in the afternoon! Almost no people, lots of snow and glorious sunshine!

7th heaven was great in the afternoon! Almost no people, lots of snow and glorious sunshine!
Very nice day today... we have one day left here and are not excited to get back to the east coast ice. up top is excellent, still plenty of snow and down below is wet in the afternoon and icy in the am but even that can still be fun.mid mountain up is great though.

Very nice day today... we have one day left here and are not excited to get back to the east coast ice. up top is excellent, still plenty of snow and down below is wet in the afternoon and icy in the am but even that can still be fun.mid mountain up is great though.

Very nice day today... we have one day left here and are not excited to get back to the east coast ice. up top is excellent, still plenty of snow and down below is wet in the afternoon and icy in the am but even that can still be fun.mid mountain up is great though.
Stay in the Alpine and it's all good. Below Rendezvous on Blackcomb is pretty icy

Stay in the Alpine and it's all good. Below Rendezvous on Blackcomb is pretty icy

Stay in the Alpine and it's all good. Below Rendezvous on Blackcomb is pretty icy
Ryan Bougie—Ski Patroller. Ryan Bougie’s young, handsome (and mustached) face belies his tremendous experience in the mountains. Amongst a core group of committed backcountry skiers in Whistler, Bougie is known as the guy who takes on the most extended, immersive and by all accounts extremely difficult self-propelled escapes into North American wilderness.   The 30-year-old modern day explorer has recently returned to his patrolling post on Blackcomb after a winter-long hiatus last season: a five-and-a-half-month, 1500 km walking, skiing, pack-rafting and bushwhacking journey from Vancouver to Alaska.  Bougie’s commitment to the long-form format began when he left high school early to walk down the Pacific Crest trail from Canada to Mexico. Since then, he has cycled across Canada, made remote, committed ski-mountaineering first descents on Mount Foraker (Alaska's 4th highest peak), amongst yearly self-propelled pilgrimages through BC, Alaska and Arctic wilderness, culminating in his mega-transect of the BC coast range last year shared by two friends.  Guided by curiosity more than novelty, Bougie flies well under radar amongst the broader ski community. In fact, his personal achievements in wilderness often remain just that—unsung physical and mental journeys through massive and un-trafficked landscapes, inquisitions into the beauty of distant mountain ecosystems, bearing witness to remote industrial projects that most people never see. Perhaps most significantly, Bougie’s journeys are experiments-of-the-possible. - ©Jordan Manley

Ryan Bougie—Ski Patroller. Ryan Bougie’s young, handsome (and mustached) face belies his tremendous experience in the mountains. Amongst a core group of committed backcountry skiers in Whistler, Bougie is known as the guy who takes on the most extended, immersive and by all accounts extremely difficult self-propelled escapes into North American wilderness. The 30-year-old modern day explorer has recently returned to his patrolling post on Blackcomb after a winter-long hiatus last season: a five-and-a-half-month, 1500 km walking, skiing, pack-rafting and bushwhacking journey from Vancouver to Alaska. Bougie’s commitment to the long-form format began when he left high school early to walk down the Pacific Crest trail from Canada to Mexico. Since then, he has cycled across Canada, made remote, committed ski-mountaineering first descents on Mount Foraker (Alaska's 4th highest peak), amongst yearly self-propelled pilgrimages through BC, Alaska and Arctic wilderness, culminating in his mega-transect of the BC coast range last year shared by two friends. Guided by curiosity more than novelty, Bougie flies well under radar amongst the broader ski community. In fact, his personal achievements in wilderness often remain just that—unsung physical and mental journeys through massive and un-trafficked landscapes, inquisitions into the beauty of distant mountain ecosystems, bearing witness to remote industrial projects that most people never see. Perhaps most significantly, Bougie’s journeys are experiments-of-the-possible.
Copyright: Jordan Manley

Ryan Bougie—Ski Patroller. Ryan Bougie’s young, handsome (and mustached) face belies his tremendous experience in the mountains. Amongst a core group of committed backcountry skiers in Whistler, Bougie is known as the guy who takes on the most extended, immersive and by all accounts extremely difficult self-propelled escapes into North American wilderness.   The 30-year-old modern day explorer has recently returned to his patrolling post on Blackcomb after a winter-long hiatus last season: a five-and-a-half-month, 1500 km walking, skiing, pack-rafting and bushwhacking journey from Vancouver to Alaska.  Bougie’s commitment to the long-form format began when he left high school early to walk down the Pacific Crest trail from Canada to Mexico. Since then, he has cycled across Canada, made remote, committed ski-mountaineering first descents on Mount Foraker (Alaska's 4th highest peak), amongst yearly self-propelled pilgrimages through BC, Alaska and Arctic wilderness, culminating in his mega-transect of the BC coast range last year shared by two friends.  Guided by curiosity more than novelty, Bougie flies well under radar amongst the broader ski community. In fact, his personal achievements in wilderness often remain just that—unsung physical and mental journeys through massive and un-trafficked landscapes, inquisitions into the beauty of distant mountain ecosystems, bearing witness to remote industrial projects that most people never see. Perhaps most significantly, Bougie’s journeys are experiments-of-the-possible. - ©Jordan Manley
Wayne Flann—Ski Patroller. Three years ago, the relatively stable coastal snowpack characteristic of British Columbia’s coast range developed some funky, dangerous layers. Wayne Flann, a 30-year veteran of Blackcomb’s ski patrol operation who lives with his nose in the snow began to blog with the goal of giving people the straight facts about what was happening in the snow. “My inspiration is to educate people and try to get out as much information as I can to the masses,” he says. Flann’s daily detailed weather, snowpack and snow safety observations have become a big success both in the Whistler valley and reaching people all over the globe. But there is more work to be done, he feels, lamenting that many people are still accessing Whistler’s backcountry unprepared and uninformed. Flann is currently drafting a Backcountry Responsibility Code, with plans to “do it as a pilot project, see how it goes and see how the science works and hopefully get it accepted throughout North America.” - ©Jordan Manley

Wayne Flann—Ski Patroller. Three years ago, the relatively stable coastal snowpack characteristic of British Columbia’s coast range developed some funky, dangerous layers. Wayne Flann, a 30-year veteran of Blackcomb’s ski patrol operation who lives with his nose in the snow began to blog with the goal of giving people the straight facts about what was happening in the snow. “My inspiration is to educate people and try to get out as much information as I can to the masses,” he says. Flann’s daily detailed weather, snowpack and snow safety observations have become a big success both in the Whistler valley and reaching people all over the globe. But there is more work to be done, he feels, lamenting that many people are still accessing Whistler’s backcountry unprepared and uninformed. Flann is currently drafting a Backcountry Responsibility Code, with plans to “do it as a pilot project, see how it goes and see how the science works and hopefully get it accepted throughout North America.”
Copyright: Jordan Manley

Wayne Flann—Ski Patroller. Three years ago, the relatively stable coastal snowpack characteristic of British Columbia’s coast range developed some funky, dangerous layers. Wayne Flann, a 30-year veteran of Blackcomb’s ski patrol operation who lives with his nose in the snow began to blog with the goal of giving people the straight facts about what was happening in the snow. “My inspiration is to educate people and try to get out as much information as I can to the masses,” he says. Flann’s daily detailed weather, snowpack and snow safety observations have become a big success both in the Whistler valley and reaching people all over the globe. But there is more work to be done, he feels, lamenting that many people are still accessing Whistler’s backcountry unprepared and uninformed. Flann is currently drafting a Backcountry Responsibility Code, with plans to “do it as a pilot project, see how it goes and see how the science works and hopefully get it accepted throughout North America.” - ©Jordan Manley
Dale & Rosemary Hotell—Mountain Hosts. When Dale Hotell retired from a 35-year teaching career in Vancouver’s lower mainland, he decided he wanted another career, this time on the mountain running Whistler Blackcomb’s Mountain Host program. A volunteer since 1985, Dale and his wife Rosemary lived in a trailer on weekends just to do it. “Hosting gets in your blood” says the 69 year old,

Dale & Rosemary Hotell—Mountain Hosts. When Dale Hotell retired from a 35-year teaching career in Vancouver’s lower mainland, he decided he wanted another career, this time on the mountain running Whistler Blackcomb’s Mountain Host program. A volunteer since 1985, Dale and his wife Rosemary lived in a trailer on weekends just to do it. “Hosting gets in your blood” says the 69 year old, "you don’t want to give it up.” For the Hotells, who have been married 48 years, you get the sense that it’s as much about their health as it is about fun. “It keeps us young and active,” says Rosemary. “It’s hard to find an old person here—old in years but not in their minds,” adds Dale. When asked how long they’ll keep it up on the mountain, Dale says as long as they let him. "My dream is to drop dead at about 90 on skis!” Rosemary chuckles in response: “That means I’m going to need to keep skiing, too.”
Copyright: Jordan Manley

Dale & Rosemary Hotell—Mountain Hosts. When Dale Hotell retired from a 35-year teaching career in Vancouver’s lower mainland, he decided he wanted another career, this time on the mountain running Whistler Blackcomb’s Mountain Host program. A volunteer since 1985, Dale and his wife Rosemary lived in a trailer on weekends just to do it. “Hosting gets in your blood” says the 69 year old,
Ed Gordon—Parking Lot Shuttle Driver. More than most, Ed has seen a lot of changes in Whistler. When he arrived in 1976, he thought he’d only stay for a few days. He liked the “Woodsy” feel of the place. While some of his early friends left Whistler over the years as the town modernized, grew and became a world stage tourism economy, Ed has always embraced the continual evolution that defines Whistler. It’s Whistler’s landscape that keeps him here, he says, “it still is a beautiful, natural place, like a park” where he still finds quiet when he choses to. - ©Jordan Manley

Ed Gordon—Parking Lot Shuttle Driver. More than most, Ed has seen a lot of changes in Whistler. When he arrived in 1976, he thought he’d only stay for a few days. He liked the “Woodsy” feel of the place. While some of his early friends left Whistler over the years as the town modernized, grew and became a world stage tourism economy, Ed has always embraced the continual evolution that defines Whistler. It’s Whistler’s landscape that keeps him here, he says, “it still is a beautiful, natural place, like a park” where he still finds quiet when he choses to.
Copyright: Jordan Manley

Ed Gordon—Parking Lot Shuttle Driver. More than most, Ed has seen a lot of changes in Whistler. When he arrived in 1976, he thought he’d only stay for a few days. He liked the “Woodsy” feel of the place. While some of his early friends left Whistler over the years as the town modernized, grew and became a world stage tourism economy, Ed has always embraced the continual evolution that defines Whistler. It’s Whistler’s landscape that keeps him here, he says, “it still is a beautiful, natural place, like a park” where he still finds quiet when he choses to. - ©Jordan Manley
Tom Richards—Journeyman Millwright. Tom Richards’ day begins each morning at 4:30. By 6 a.m., he’s on the mountain. The same meteorological conditions that bring heavy snow and glorious storm skiing to Whistler make Tom’s job of inspecting, maintaining and repairing the lifts a difficult one. High winds, sideways snowfall, and temperatures cold or dynamic all make for a herculean task keeping the chairs moving up and down North America’s most expansive lift infrastructure.  - ©Jordan Manley

Tom Richards—Journeyman Millwright. Tom Richards’ day begins each morning at 4:30. By 6 a.m., he’s on the mountain. The same meteorological conditions that bring heavy snow and glorious storm skiing to Whistler make Tom’s job of inspecting, maintaining and repairing the lifts a difficult one. High winds, sideways snowfall, and temperatures cold or dynamic all make for a herculean task keeping the chairs moving up and down North America’s most expansive lift infrastructure.
Copyright: Jordan Manley

Tom Richards—Journeyman Millwright. Tom Richards’ day begins each morning at 4:30. By 6 a.m., he’s on the mountain. The same meteorological conditions that bring heavy snow and glorious storm skiing to Whistler make Tom’s job of inspecting, maintaining and repairing the lifts a difficult one. High winds, sideways snowfall, and temperatures cold or dynamic all make for a herculean task keeping the chairs moving up and down North America’s most expansive lift infrastructure.  - ©Jordan Manley
Tom Richards—Journeyman Millwright. In the event of a lift malfunction of breakdown, Richards sees himself as a kind of technological or mechanical paramedic—working as quickly, efficiently and effectively as possible in the elements to get things back up and running, get people back skiing. And of course “keeping people safe is a crucial part of our role,” he says. - ©Jordan Manley

Tom Richards—Journeyman Millwright. In the event of a lift malfunction of breakdown, Richards sees himself as a kind of technological or mechanical paramedic—working as quickly, efficiently and effectively as possible in the elements to get things back up and running, get people back skiing. And of course “keeping people safe is a crucial part of our role,” he says.
Copyright: Jordan Manley

Tom Richards—Journeyman Millwright. In the event of a lift malfunction of breakdown, Richards sees himself as a kind of technological or mechanical paramedic—working as quickly, efficiently and effectively as possible in the elements to get things back up and running, get people back skiing. And of course “keeping people safe is a crucial part of our role,” he says. - ©Jordan Manley
Joe Barnes—Snowmaking. When Mother Nature drops the ball, Joe Barnes and the snowmaking team are the unsung heroes that perform magic with air, water and cold temperatures. Joe’s job is unique in the valley, he says, and it’s amazing to work at night (shifts last 12hrs), cruising up and down the mountain on the snowmobile maintaining the snow guns. When Joe isn’t working, he’s slashing the piles of snow he helped create the night before or out ski touring, putting in more than a hundred days a season on skis. - ©Jordan Manley

Joe Barnes—Snowmaking. When Mother Nature drops the ball, Joe Barnes and the snowmaking team are the unsung heroes that perform magic with air, water and cold temperatures. Joe’s job is unique in the valley, he says, and it’s amazing to work at night (shifts last 12hrs), cruising up and down the mountain on the snowmobile maintaining the snow guns. When Joe isn’t working, he’s slashing the piles of snow he helped create the night before or out ski touring, putting in more than a hundred days a season on skis.
Copyright: Jordan Manley

Joe Barnes—Snowmaking. When Mother Nature drops the ball, Joe Barnes and the snowmaking team are the unsung heroes that perform magic with air, water and cold temperatures. Joe’s job is unique in the valley, he says, and it’s amazing to work at night (shifts last 12hrs), cruising up and down the mountain on the snowmobile maintaining the snow guns. When Joe isn’t working, he’s slashing the piles of snow he helped create the night before or out ski touring, putting in more than a hundred days a season on skis. - ©Jordan Manley
Felix Breault—Cook. Originally from Montreal, Felix migrated west in search of mountains and a different balance. “Life’s better over here,” he says. “I snowboard almost everyday, everyone is in a good mood and there are lots of foreign girls!

Felix Breault—Cook. Originally from Montreal, Felix migrated west in search of mountains and a different balance. “Life’s better over here,” he says. “I snowboard almost everyday, everyone is in a good mood and there are lots of foreign girls!"
Copyright: Jordan Manley

Felix Breault—Cook. Originally from Montreal, Felix migrated west in search of mountains and a different balance. “Life’s better over here,” he says. “I snowboard almost everyday, everyone is in a good mood and there are lots of foreign girls!

Best Whistler/Blackcomb Hotels

Powder alert in Whistler/Blackcomb

0 INCHES
Past 24 Hours
Never miss another Powder Alert! Sign up now!

Advertisement

Latest News

View All

Whistler/Blackcomb Snow 101 - ©Paul Morrison/Whistler Blackcomb

Whistler/Blackcomb Snow 101

Learn how to predict the weather like a Whistler/Blackcomb local using these tips from Meteorologist Joel Gratz.... More

Advertisement

Current Conditions

at Whistler/Blackcomb

Latest Snowfall

24 HR

0"

48 HR

0"

72 HR

0"
View Full Snow Report Current Weather

Aug 31

41°F

View Full Forecast

Advertisement